FAQ - Isolation and Exposure
ESPAÑOL

Guidance

What to do if you have COVID-19
 
I tested positive for COVID-19. What do I do?

  • If you are sick with COVID-19, follow these isolation guidelines for 10 days after your symptoms started and 24 hours after fever is reduced without taking fever reducing medications (or 10 days after testing if no symptoms) to protect other people in your home and in your community.
  • For additional information from the CDC, here are things you can do (Spanishto manage your COVID-19 symptoms at home.
  • Stay home except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas. Take care of yourself. Get rest and stay hydrated. Avoid public transportation, ride-sharing or taxis.
  • Separate yourself as much as possible. If possible, stay in a specific room and away from people at home. If possible, use a separate bathroom. If you can't, clean the bathroom's high-touch surfaces after each use.
  • If you need to be around other people in the home, wear a cloth face covering over your nose and mouth.
  • Use your own plate, bowl and utensils - do not share food or any of these items to anyone.
  • Cover sneezes, wash your hands often, avoid sharing personal items and disinfect high-touch surfaces everyday.

When can I safely end home isolation?

  • If you do not have severely immunocompromised conditions** and have mild to moderate illness, you are no longer considered contagious 10 days after symptoms started and 24 hours have passed since having a fever without taking a fever-reducing medication (for those with no symptoms, 10 days after being swabbed or tested). 
  • If you are severely* or critically ill* or have conditions that severely compromise their immune system**, you are considered contagious for 20 days after first symptoms first appeared and 24 hours have passed since they had a fever without taking a fever-reducing medication (for those with no symptoms, 20 days after being swabbed or tested).

Note:
* Severe illness – individuals with respiratory frequency >30 breaths/min, saturation of oxygen (SpO2)<94% on room air at sea level (or, for patients with chronic hypoxemia, a decrease from baseline of >3%), ratio of arterial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2)<300mmHG, of lung infiltrates >50%.
* Critical illness – individuals with respiratory failure, septic shock and/or multiple organ dysfunction.
** Severely immunocompromised – individuals who are on chemotherapy for cancer, have untreated HIV infection with CD4 T lymphocyte count <200, have combined primary immunodeficiency disorder or are on prednisone>20mg/day for more than 14 days. Ultimately, the degree of immunocompromise for the patient is determined by the treating provider.

I have completed my isolation and am ready to return to work, but my company is asking for negative test results. What do I do?

  • Solano Public Health does not recommend retesting to discontinue isolation. In many situations, remnants of the virus remain in the body for up to 90 days, and can cause a positive test result.
  • For those who do not have severely immunocompromised conditions** and have mild to moderate illness, you are no longer contagious 10 days after your symptoms began and 24 hours after fever has resolved and can no longer transmit the virus, and should be able to get back to work (for those with no symptoms, 10 days after being swabbed or tested).
  • For those who are severely ill* or critically ill* or have conditions that severely compromise their immune system*, you are considered contagious for 20 days after their symptoms first appeared and 24 hours have passed had a fever without them taking a fever-reducing medication (for those with no symptoms, 20 days after they were swabbed or tested).

Note:
* Severe illness – individuals with respiratory frequency >30 breaths/min, saturation of oxygen (SpO2)<94% on room air at sea level (or, for patients with chronic hypoxemia, a decrease from baseline of >3%), ratio of arterial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2)<300mmHG, of lung infiltrates >50%.
* Critical illness – individuals with respiratory failure, septic shock and/or multiple organ dysfunction.
** Severely immunocompromised – individuals who are on chemotherapy for cancer, have untreated HIV infection with CD4 T lymphocyte count <200, have combined primary immunodeficiency disorder or are on prednisone>20mg/day for more than 14 days. Ultimately, the degree of immunocompromise for the patient is determined by the treating provider.

What to do if you have been exposed to COVID-19

How do I know if I have been exposed to COVID-19?

  • You can get exposed when you come into direct contact with the secretions (droplets) of someone who has COVID-19 (being coughed on or sneezed on, etc.). People often get exposed by a household member or through close contact with another person. Close contact means that you have been less than 6 feet with someone with COVID-19 for more than 15 minutes, with one or both individuals not wearing a cloth face covering.

I had close contact with someone who has COVID-19. What do I do?

  • If you work at a high-risk congregate setting (skilled nursing facility, long-term care facility, memory care, assisted living, dialysis center, jail or prison), you will need to quarantine for 14 days, separate yourself from others and not go to work during this time. Monitor yourself for symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days since the last date of exposure. The Solano Public Health Epidemiology Team will follow up with individuals who work in these settings. Schedule testing for COVID-19 on the 13th or 14th day of quarantine. . A negative test result is required on the 13th or 14th day after last exposure for workers at high-risk settings before going back to work.
  • If you do not work at a high-risk setting, Solano Public Health does not advise quarantine, and you may continue to work. Monitor yourself for symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days since the last date of exposure. Make sure you practice 6-feet social distancing from anyone at home or in the workplace and when out in public settings.

What if I develop symptoms of COVID-19?

  • Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. Symptoms include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.
  • If symptoms develop, consult your healthcare provider and schedule for testing. While waiting for test results, follow self-isolation guidance above.

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